Saturday, May 16, 2009

SUNDAY, overhauled

In the mail today, an advertisement for the local Sunday paper. Here is what Sunday amounts to in modern day America, according to the advertisers for the Wisconsin State Journal:

IT'S SUNDAY.
It's when you take a break from the rat race and join the human one. It's when you do what you want to do, at your own pace...
No matter what your ideal Sunday entails--shopping, planning, relaxing or exploring--it all starts with the Sunday Wisconsin State Journal.


No mention of what Sunday used to mean in America: church!

5 comments:

Evan said...

Wow, not even a squishy ecumenical throwaway line involving the word "spiritual".

Anonymous said...

Why isn't every day celebrated as the Lord's Day? Why just the first day of the week?

A.None-of-that-other-mouse

T Gullixson said...

My parents made the rule not to read the comics before church service so that one's mind is not distracted from Bible study and worship. I have continued that rule. Sunday begins with worship. The paper can wait until we return from church.

PW said...

Don't even get the paper. Being a pastor's wife, church is Sunday. However, before I was married, Sunday was church. Great point, not even a general mention to the effect of 'attending your local house of worship'. Sunday is no longer for church. Think of all the activities that compete with church.

Parade Rest said...

Sunday is still predominately church for my family. Certainly at least until kickoff.

As for Sunday papers, they're the only reason we continue to subscribe to hardcopy. The Sunday coupons more than pay for the 7-day subscription. As long as somebody else, say my wife, for example, spends the clipping time.

I almost never look at the comics anymore. That stopped with the end of Calvin and Hobbes and Bloom County. When I pick them up now, I can't imagine what ever drew me to them. The "sequel" stip to Bloom County (Sunday only Outland) is sometimes amusing, but not as addictive as the original. Wouldn't have anything to do with my aging, I'm sure.

I still look at Dilbert. But never on Sunday. I look at the Sunday strip online at work Monday. It's like being paid to laugh. At my own life.